#SOL18 – My Childhood

My childhood tasted like…

still steaming New York City style bagels: pumpernickel, rye, and everything,

Charlie’s chips and pretzels from a tin,

homemade Jewish Apple Cake,

fried spam or pork roll sandwiches with yellow mustard,

Italian hoagies,

wonton soup and egg rolls,

Philadephia soft pretzels, either just baked or cold from being sold on Bustleton Avenue,

cherry cheesecake and french fries for lunch,

and my grandmother’s wide noodle homemade chicken soup.

 

My childhood sounded like…

children playing in the pool,

air raid sirens every weekday at noon,

lawnmowers,

the theme song of Little House on the Prarie,

robins,

and

my dad’s laugh.

 

My childhood smelled like…

freshly-cut grass,

azalea bushes,

chorine,

Pennypack Park,

and

sweaty bodies of kids playing.

(Thank you to Stopping by an English Class on a Random Day for the idea for this post).

15 thoughts on “#SOL18 – My Childhood

  1. I love this structure,Aileen. I might just steal it for a future post.
    I still have a Charles Chip can that I store “S” cookies in at Christmas, just like my mother did.
    Your childhood memories bring me back to my own!

  2. A great post – so enjoyable to read, and my fingers are itching to try this in my writer’s notebook. Everything is so familiar – I connected with the sound of your dad’s laugh, azaleas, lawnmowers, air raids, cherry cheesecake, soft pretzels, chlorine, robins, homemade Jewish applecake. A delicious piece that brings back wonderful memories!

  3. This is a great format, Aileen. The images you created took me back in time and offered many connections. I’m looking for inspiration – may have to try this in the coming week.

  4. As others have said, this is a great format. I think it would be a neat way to get students to think about who they are and the environment in which they live.

  5. This is beautiful. The images are so clear & specific. I’m particularly moved by those anchored in time: the air raid siren, fried Spam, and the theme to Little House.

  6. The imagery! I would love to sit down and pen my own childhood this way. When I teach my students about sensory details with narrative writing, I always tell them that the five senses can create vivid images in readers. Your usage of the senses to structure your writing in this post accomplishes volumes!

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